2 Steps to Hydrated Skin

Your skin is hard at work while you’re asleep — and you can help it regenerate and repair itself by selecting the right products. As a reward, you’ll wake up with fresh, moisturized, healthy skin.

“There’s a circadian rhythm to your skin,” Dr. Shasa Hu, associate professor in the department of dermatology and cutaneous surgery at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, told TODAY.

Because skin processes are a bit different at night, your skin may absorb more of the active ingredients in skin care products while you sleep, she explained. Research has shown that skin permeability is higher in the evening and nighttime hours than in the morning. So while you could use the same products that you use during the day, “At night is where you really want to take advantage…and maximize your skin care benefits by changing it up,” Hu said.

But your routine doesn’t need to be complex. The most basic, essential nightly skin care regimen only requires two steps: cleanser and moisturizer, said Dr. Evan Rieder, assistant professor in the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, told TODAY.

Cleanser

When selecting a cleanser, pretty much everyone would be fine with using a fragrance-free, gentle cleanser every morning and night, Dr. Nada Elbuluk, associate professor of dermatology at the USC Keck School of Medicine, told TODAY.

Those with acne-prone or oily skin may find they prefer a foaming cleanser with light exfoliating properties, like those containing salicylic acid, Rieder said.

If your usual cleanser doesn’t remove all of the makeup, sunscreen or other products on your skin, you might want to try using makeup remover, micellar water or another type of cleanser first, Rieder said. But a simple splash of water from the sink, makeup remover or micellar water on their own aren’t enough to count as your cleanser step, Elbuluk added.

Moisturizer

One of the best things you can do for your skin at night is to “use a really good moisturizer that has good ingredients,” Elbuluk said. “Your skin is sort of repairing itself overnight,” she continued. So at night “is a really good time” to put on ingredients that may aid in that process.

Look for something that contains both hydrating ingredients (such as hyaluronic acid and glycerin) as well as ceramides, which act like the glue between skin cells to help seal that moisture in, the experts advised.

“Even when you don’t have dry skin, by adding a layer of moisturizer, you’re really helping to boost the integrity of your skin barrier,” Hu explained. Keeping the skin barrier intact prevents your skin from drying out, cracking and peeling.

But depending on your individual skin needs and how those might change throughout the year, you may find it best to use different types of moisturizers, Rieder said. “Often I’m recommending people use gels and lotions when the weather is warm and very humid,” he explained, and those options are generally preferable for people with oilier skin. People who tend to have acne-prone skin should also opt for non-comedogenic moisturizers that won’t clog their pores, Elbuluk said.

When the weather is dry and cold, or if your skin is dry or sensitive year-round, you may prefer to use a thicker cream or even an ointment, like Vaseline, Rieder said. People with certain skin issues, like sensitivity and rosacea, should “look for a moisturizer with more lipids (ceramides) in them,” Hu added. “That not only helps to restore but also repair the skin barrier.”

When you’re ready to add more…

Once you reach your 30s and 40s and you want to start tackling some early signs of aging, that’s “an appropriate time to consider using a retinol- or retinal-based product at night,” Elbuluk said. If you’re new to retinol, she suggests starting with products including retinal (also called retinaldehyde), which tends to be gentler on the skin.

Another option is to look for the ingredient adapalene, Rieder said. This synthetic retinoid was previously only available with a prescription but can now be found in a few over-the-counter products. From there, you may be able to build your way up to prescription retinoids, like tretinoin or tazarotene.

Retinoids like these are “the gold standard in thinking about anti-aging,” Rieder said. They can help build collagen, even out skin tone, decrease the appearance and development of fine lines and generally “brighten up” dull skin, he said.

As you get older, you may find it helpful to add products containing peptides, Elbuluk said. Peptides can help stimulate collagen production, Hu explained, and, therefore, may help counteract wrinkles and fine lines over time.

But the science is still out on these ingredients, Rieder said. And, knowing that many peptide products come with a hefty price tag, he calls these ingredients “nice to do” but not necessary.

As always, remember to add new products to your routine slowly — and consistency is the most important factor for results. Starting too much at once puts you at risk of upsetting your skin, which could throw off your whole regimen.

“You want to work on beginning to do anti-aging type things, but also making sure that you’re not irritating your skin with whatever you’re using,” Elbuluk said. And, when in doubt, check in with a dermatologist to get recommendations that are right for your individual skin situation.

https://news.yahoo.com/night-skincare-routine-2-steps-184315294.html