Taking two 5mg cialis

Comparison of the efficacy and safety of 5-mg once-daily versus 5-mg alternate-day tadalafil in men with erectile dysfunction and lower urinary tract symptoms.
The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of 5-mg once-daily tadalafil versus 5-mg alternate-day tadalafil in men with moderate-to-severe erectile dysfunction (ED) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Between January 2012 and June 2013, 144 men presenting with an International Index of Erectile Function-5 (IIEF-5) score of 8 were enrolled to the study. Patients were allocated the simple alternate randomization into Group I (5-mg once-daily tadalafil) and Group II (5-mg alternate-day tadalafil). Changes in IIEF scores, Sexual Encounter Profile Question 3 (SEP Q3) percentage, IPSS, uroflowmetry and post void residual at the first visit (V1), week 4 (V2) and week 12 (V3) were compared. No significant difference was found between the baseline patient characteristics of Group I and Group II. Treatment with 5-mg daily tadalafil demonstrated improvement in IIEF, SEP Q3 percentage and IPSS score between V1 and V2, and that between V1 and V3. Patients receiving 5-mg alternate-day tadalafil also showed a significant improvement in IIEF, SEP Q3 percentage, and IPSS score between V1 and V2, and that between V2 and V3. However, no significant improvements were found in any other parameters. There were no significant differences between Group I and Group II apart from IIEF scores in V2 (19.4 versus 17.9, respectively). The SEP Q3 percentage was also higher at the V2 visit for Group I and Group II (35.6 versus 30.9%). Even with no placebo control and short of LUTS medication control, the use of 5-mg once-daily or alternate-day treatment with tadalafil was well tolerated in patients and effectively improved the IIEF score, IPSS score and SEP Q3 percentage. Management of patients with 5-mg alternate-day tadalafil could be adequate for regular use in patients with ED and LUTS.
Similar articles.
Kim KS, Jeong TY, Moon HS. Kim KS, et al. Medicine (Baltimore). 2020 Jun 5;99(23):e20546. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000020546. Medicine (Baltimore). 2020. PMID: 32502017 Free PMC article.
Porst H, Roehrborn CG, Secrest RJ, Esler A, Viktrup L. Porst H, et al. J Sex Med. 2013 Aug;10(8):2044-52. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12212. Epub 2013 Jun 19. J Sex Med. 2013. PMID: 23782459 Clinical Trial.
Bechara A, Casabe A, Rodriguez Baigorri G, Cobreros C. Bechara A, et al. J Sex Med. 2014 Feb;11(2):498-505. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12386. Epub 2013 Nov 13. J Sex Med. 2014. PMID: 24224728.
Carson CC, Rosenberg M, Kissel J, Wong DG. Carson CC, et al. Int J Clin Pract. 2014 Jan;68(1):94-103. doi: 10.1111/ijcp.12305. Int J Clin Pract. 2014. PMID: 24341303 Review.
Wang Y, Bao Y, Liu J, Duan L, Cui Y. Wang Y, et al. Low Urin Tract Symptoms. 2018 Jan;10(1):84-92. doi: 10.1111/luts.12144. Epub 2016 Nov 5. Low Urin Tract Symptoms. 2018. PMID: 29341503 Review.
Cited by.
Chen Q, Mao Y, Zhou H, Tang S. Chen Q, et al. Int J Clin Pract. 2022 Nov 3;2022:9298483. doi: 10.1155/2022/9298483. eCollection 2022. Int J Clin Pract. 2022. PMID: 36419863 Free PMC article.
Williams P, McBain H, Amirova A, Newman S, Mulligan K. Williams P, et al. Int J Impot Res. 2021 Jan;33(1):16-42. doi: 10.1038/s41443-020-0249-1. Epub 2020 Mar 31. Int J Impot Res. 2021. PMID: 32231275.
References.
J Urol. 2013 Mar;189(3):1006-13 – PubMed Eur Urol. 2005 Jun;47(6):846-54; discussion 854 – PubMed Eur Urol. 2010 May;57(5):804-14 – PubMed J Sex Med. 2007 Jan;4(1):176-182 – PubMed Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2009 Feb;10(2):155-60 – PubMed.

Trt side effects

trt side effects

Testosterone Replacement Therapy: Myths and Facts

If you’ve been diagnosed with an abnormally low T, testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) offers a lot of benefits. But there are risks, too.

Here’s what you need to know before you start TRT.

Can testosterone replacement therapy make me feel more energetic?

If you have an abnormally low T, boosting your testosterone levels with TRT can help bring your energy levels back to normal. It can also restore your sex drive.

You may notice a drop in body fat and a buildup of muscle mass after TRT.

Are there risks to testosterone replacement therapy?

Yes. TRT has side effects, which may include:

  • Acne and oily skin
  • Lower sperm count, which can cause infertility
  • Increased risk of blood clots
  • Shrinkage of the testicles
  • Larger breasts
  • Increased risk of heart attack and stroke

Should I avoid testosterone replacement therapy if I have certain conditions?

Guidelines from the Endocrine Society say you should not have TRT if you have prostate cancer or breast cancer.

But some studies suggest that men who have been successfully treated for prostate cancer may be candidates for TRT as long as they are closely watched for signs of disease. Before starting TRT, your doctor should assess your risk for prostate cancer.

You might be told by a doctor not to get TRT if you have these conditions, which may be made worse by TRT:

  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Severe lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary frequency and urgency, associated with an enlarged prostate, or BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia)
  • Severe congestive heart failure
  • Above-normal red blood cell counts

TRT is also not advised to be used for treating those with low testosterone caused by aging.

Can testosterone replacement therapy treat ED?

If you have low testosterone, TRT may help restore your ability to have healthy erections and can boost your sex drive.

But ED has many other possible causes. Low testosterone may not be the whole story behind your ED. Talk to your doctor to determine what’s at the root of your erection problems.

How do I take testosterone replacement therapy?

TRT comes in several different forms. Each has pros and cons.

Patches. These are easy to apply. But patches can cause skin rashes and may have to be applied more than once a day.

Gels. You rub gels into the skin daily. They are convenient to use. But you have to be careful that no one comes into contact with the treated area for several hours after you’ve applied it. Otherwise they could get testosterone in their system. A nasal gel is now available that eliminates the risk of exposure to others.

Buccal patch. You put this on your upper gum twice a day. These patches are convenient but can cause irritation or gum disease.

Injections. Injections are given anywhere from 2 to 10 weeks apart. They are inexpensive compared to other treatments. But injections may not provide steady benefits. Your testosterone levels will go back down between doses.

Subcutaneous pellets. Your doctor inserts these under your skin every 3 to 6 months. They are very convenient once they’re put in, but they require minor surgery for each dose.

How will I be monitored while on testosterone replacement therapy?

Your doctor will measure your testosterone levels at the 3- and 6-month marks after treatment begins. After that you’ll be tested once a year. If your levels are OK you’ll stay on your current dose.

If your testosterone levels are too low, your dose may be adjusted. At the same time, your doctor will check your red blood cell levels.

Within 1 to 2 years of TRT, your doctor will measure your bone density if you had osteoporosis when treatment began. Your doctor will evaluate your prostate cancer risk at the start of treatment and may do more tests at the 3- and 6-month marks, and then annually.

Patients taking TRT should call 911 immediately if they have symptoms which include:

How long do I have to take testosterone replacement therapy?

Indefinitely. TRT does not cure low testosterone, so your symptoms may return if you stop taking it.

Show Sources

Urology Care Foundation: “Low Testosterone (Hypogonadism).”

Bassil, N. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, June 22, 2009.

McGill, J. Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine, November 2012.

Endocrine Society: “Testosterone Therapy in Adult Men with Androgen Deficiency Syndromes.”

High testosterone face features

high testosterone face features

Testosterone, Smiling, and Facial Appearance

In a study of possible links between testosterone and dominance, 119 men and 114 women provided saliva samples for testosterone assay and posed smiling and not smiling for portrait photographs. Expert judges viewing the photographs found smaller smiles among high than low testosterone men, with less zygomatic major (raising the corners of the mouth) and orbicularis oculi (raising the cheeks and crinkling around the corners of the eyes) muscle activity. Naive judges viewing individual photographs gave higher potency ratings to smiling high testosterone men than smiling low testosterone men. Naive judges viewing photographs grouped into high and low testosterone sets gave higher potency and lower goodness ratings to high than to low testosterone men, regardless of whether they were smiling. Among women, judges found only slight relationships between testosterone and facial appearance. The pattern among men of less smiling with higher testosterone levels fits with research linking testosterone to face-to-face dominance.

Access options

Buy single article

Instant access to the full article PDF.

References

  • Albert, D. J., Walsh, M. L., & Jonik, R. H. (1993). Aggression in humans: What is its biological foundation? Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 17, 405–425. Google Scholar
  • Archer, J. (1991). The influence of testosterone on human aggression. British Journal of Psychology, 82, 1–28. Google Scholar
  • Bernhardt, P. C., Dabbs, J. M., Jr., Fielden, J. A., & Lutter, C. (1996). Testosterone changes during vicarious experiences of victory and defeat in spectators of sporting events. Manuscript under editorial review.
  • Bernstein, I. S., Rose, R. M., & Gordon, T. P. (1974). Behavioral and environmental events influencing primate testosterone levels. Journal of Human Evolution, 3, 517–525. Google Scholar
  • Booth, A., & Dabbs, J. M., Jr. (1993). Testosterone and men’s marriages. Social Forces, 72, 463–477. Google Scholar
  • Booth, A., Shelley, G., Mazur, A., Tharp, G., & Kittok, R. (1989). Testosterone, and winning and losing in human competition. Hormones and Behavior, 23, 555–571. Google Scholar
  • Cashdan, E. (1995). Hormones, sex, and status in women. Hormones and Behavior, 29, 354–366. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr. (1990). Salivary testosterone measurements: Reliability across hours, days, and weeks. Physiology and Behavior, 48, 83–86. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr. (1993). Salivary testosterone measurements in behavioral studies. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 694, 177–183. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr., Carr, T. S., Frady, R. L., & Riad, J. K. (1995). Testosterone, crime, and misbehavior among 692 male prison inmates. Personality and Individual Differences, 18, 627–633. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr., de La Rue, D., & Williams, P. M. (1990). Testosterone and occupational choice: Actors, ministers, and other men. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 59, 1261–1265. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr., Hargrove, M. F., & Heusel, C. (1996). Testosterone differences among college fraternities: Well-behaved vs. rambunctious. Personality and Individual Differences, 20, 157–161. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr., & Morris, R. (1990). Testosterone, social class, and antisocial behavior in a sample of 4,462 men. Psychological Science, 1, 209–211. Google Scholar
  • Dabbs, J. M., Jr., Ruback, R. B., Frady, R. L., Hopper, C. H., & Sgoutas, D. S. (1988). Saliva testosterone and criminal violence among women. Personality and Individual Differences, 9, 269–275. Google Scholar
  • Ekman, P., Davidson, R., & Friesen, W. V. (1990). Emotional expression and brain physiology II: The Duchenne smile. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 58, 342–353. Google Scholar
  • Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1978). Facial action coding system: A technique for the measurement of facial movement. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press. Google Scholar
  • Ekman, P., & Heider, K. G. (1988). The universality of a contempt expression: A replication. Motivation and Emotion, 12, 303–308. Google Scholar
  • Exline, R. V. (1972). Visual interaction: The glances of power and preference. In J. K. Cole (Ed.), Nebraska Symposium on Motivation: Vol. 19. Current theory and research in motivation, (pp. 163–206). Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. Google Scholar
  • Friesen, W. (1986). Recent developments in FACS—EMFACS. Face Value: Facial Measurement Newsletter, 1(1), 1–1. Google Scholar
  • Hall, J. A. (1984). Nonverbal sex differences: Communication accuracy and expressive style. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Google Scholar
  • Hall, J. A., & Halberstadt, A. G. (1986). Smiling and gazing. In J. S. Hyde & M. C. Linn (Eds.), The psychology of gender: Advances through meta-analysis (pp. 136–158). Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press. Google Scholar
  • Hess, U., Banse, R., & Kappas, A. (1995). The intensity of facial expression is determined by underlying affective state and social stimuli. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 280–288. Google Scholar
  • LaFrance, M., & Carmen, B. (1980). The nonverbal display of psychological androgyny. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 36–49. Google Scholar
  • Lykken, D., & Tellegen, A. (1996). Happiness is a stochastic phenomenon. Psychological Science, 7, 186–189. Google Scholar
  • Mazur, A. (1985). A biosocial model of status in face-to-face primate groups. Social Forces, 64, 377–402. Google Scholar
  • Mazur, A., Mazur, J., & Keating, C. (1984). Military rank attainment of a West Point class: Effects of cadets’ physical features. American Journal of Sociology, 90, 125–150. Google Scholar
  • Mazur, A., & Mueller, U. (1996). Channel modeling: From West Point cadet to general. Public Administration Review, 56, 191–198. Google Scholar
  • Meikle, A. W., Stringham, J. D., Bishop, D. T., & West, D. W. (1988). Quantitating genetic and nongenetic factors influencing androgen production and clearance rates in men. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 67, 104–109. Google Scholar
  • Navarro, M. A., Juan, L., & Bonnin, M. R. (1986). Salivary testosterone: Relationship to total and free testosterone in serum. Clinical Chemistry, 32, 231–232. Google Scholar
  • Osgood, C. E., Suci, G. J., & Tannenbaum, P. H. (1957). The measurement of meaning. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois. Google Scholar
  • Schindler, G. L. (1979). Testosterone concentration, personality patterns, and occupational choice in women. Dissertation Abstracts International, 40, 1411A. (University Microfilms No. 79-19,403).
  • Seaford, H. W., Jr. (1976). Cultural facial expression. In E. Giles & J. S. Friedlaender (Eds.), The measures of man (pp. 616–639). Cambridge, MA: Peabody Museum. Google Scholar
  • Sherwin, B. B., Gelfand, M. M., & Brender, W. (1985). Androgen enhances sexual motivation in females: A prospective, crossover study of sex steroid administration in the surgical menopause. Psychosomatic Medicine, 47, 339–351. Google Scholar
  • Vermeulen, A., & Verdonck, G. (1992). Representativeness of a single point plasma testosterone level for the long term hormonal milieu in men. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 74, 939–942. Google Scholar
  • Zebrowitz, L. A., Olson, K., & Hoffman, K. (1993). Stability of babyfaceness and attractiveness across the life span. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 64, 453–466. Google Scholar

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Corresponding author

Rights and permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Dabbs, J.M. Testosterone, Smiling, and Facial Appearance. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior 21, 45–55 (1997). https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1024947801843

Share this article

Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article.

Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative

Keywords

Testosterone meaning

testosterone, encyclopedia, encyclopeadia, britannica, article

testosterone

While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules, there may be some discrepancies. Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions.

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

While every effort has been made to follow citation style rules, there may be some discrepancies. Please refer to the appropriate style manual or other sources if you have any questions.

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

Encyclopaedia Britannica’s editors oversee subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge, whether from years of experience gained by working on that content or via study for an advanced degree. They write new content and verify and edit content received from contributors.

testosterone, hormone produced by the male testis that is responsible for development of the male sex organs and masculine characteristics, including facial hair and deepening of the voice. Testosterone was isolated from testicular extracts in 1935. Its discovery followed that of an androgen (male hormone) called androsterone, which was isolated from urine in 1931. However, testosterone proved to be more potent than androsterone, which was later shown to be a biochemical product (a metabolite) of testosterone.

A healthy man produces about 5 mg (1.8 × 10 −4 ounces) of testosterone daily. Testosterone serves as a circulating prohormone for a more active androgen called dihydrotestosterone. Testosterone is converted to dihydrotestosterone in most tissues that are sensitive to androgens, including the testes, prostate gland, hair follicles, and muscles. Although testosterone itself has androgenic actions, its conversion to dihydrotestosterone is critical to the development of external genitalia in boys. Testosterone is also converted to estradiol in adipose tissue (and to a lesser extent in some other tissues), which is the most important source of estrogen in men. Furthermore, testosterone is interconvertible with androstenedione, which can be converted into estrogens. When androstenedione is formed in adipose tissue, it may be converted to a form of estrogen called estrone.

Similar to other steroid hormones, testosterone exists in serum in two forms. Most testosterone in the serum is bound to sex hormone-binding globulin and to albumin, while the remaining amount (about 1 percent) is free, or unbound. Free testosterone is in equilibrium with bound testosterone so that when free testosterone enters cells, some bound testosterone is immediately freed. In the cytoplasm of target cells, testosterone or dihydrotestosterone binds to specific androgen receptors, and the hormone-receptor complexes enter the cell nucleus, where they modulate protein synthesis by influencing the rate at which particular genes are transcribed (see transcription).

Testosterone has several major actions. It provides negative feedback inhibition on the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from the hypothalamus and the secretion of luteinizing hormone from the pituitary gland. It also directs the development of the embryonic Wolffian ducts into the vas deferens (ductus deferens) and seminal vesicles and stimulates the formation of muscle and bone. Dihydrotestosterone is responsible for sperm maturation during spermatogenesis, for the formation of the prostate gland and external genitalia, and for sexual maturation at puberty.

Testosterone can be manufactured by chemical and microbiological modification of inexpensive steroids, such as diosgenin. It is used clinically to treat testicular insufficiency, to suppress lactation (milk production), and to treat certain types of breast cancer.

How much testosterone should a man take

how much testosterone should a man take

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Dosage Considerations

If you are low in your free testosterone, your testosterone dose will reflect your free testosterone level. Equally important is watching your level of estrogen. Estrogen raises your sex hormone binding globulin. So you have to control your estrogen and you have to be looking at the free testosterone to know how much testosterone you should be taking.

On average the actual dose given per week is somewhere between 1 cc and 0.4 cc’s of testosterone 200mg/ml. There is a pretty big range of actual testosterone given between those parameters. At 0.4 cc you are getting 80mg and at 1 cc you are getting 200 mg. The 0.4 is a lower dose and 1 cc is a higher dose. I do have you know a few people that need 1 CC but it is few and far between. Just to give you an idea, maybe 10-15% of my patients on testosterone replacement therapy need this much. Most people are on the 0.5- 0.7ml range. Your dose can vary at any given time too based on how much you are exercising, how much stress is in your life, new medications, etc.

Non-Laboratory Testosterone Replacement Therapy Considerations

The other considerations have more to do with how you feel on your testosterone replacement therapy. The biggest point to emphasize is that we don’t want to focus too much on the lab values. We don’t treat the lab , we treat the human. So instead of a heavy focus on the labs we want to treat how you feel.

There is a limit on how much we emphasize both labs and symptoms, however. We wouldn’t not, for instance, just say take as much as you wanted until you feel good. Typically we shoot for the minimum effective dose for optimal symptom resolution. We are looking for you to be on the upper end of the free testosterone. With this you should experience improvement in things like sex drive, libido, and energy. It is not advisable to take your testosterone above the upper end of the reference range for your free testosterone. This is around 200 to 240 ng/dl. Some people actually feel worse on that upper end. So you have to pay attention to things like your stress level, your sleep, and things like that. If these things are getting disrupted or you feel worse on higher levels that may be something to pay attention to. For more on this topic check out,

So it is not always good to just go to the upper end because you think more is better. Sometimes it is, but not for everyone. Keep this in mind when you and your doctor are checking your testosterone levels.

Testosterone Replacement Therapy Dosing

I also wanted to talk about dosing and how frequently you take your injection of testosterone. Typically, testosterone injections work in a seven day cycle. After the injection your testosterone will start to go up about 24-48 hours after your injection. Then it will start to come down around 6-7 days. This is the typical with most people. Sometimes people get a spike right after the shot and then it comes down quickly. This occurs in people that are metabolizing it quicker. For these people, we will usually switch to twice a week dosing or every 3.5 days. They will do a smaller dose every 3.5 days. You will only know if this is occurring if you are checking your levels frequently enough and checking in the middle of the week.

As mentioned many times I find that people are checking their testosterone levels right before they get their injection. When you do this, you are missing everything that happens in between, including high estrogen. The estrogen will trail the testosterone by about a day or two. So if you are at your peak of testosterone on day two, three, or four, then your estrogen is going to be peaking shortly after. So you want to be checking your estrogen levels in the middle of your injection-week. When you are taking it twice a week, this doesn’t seem to matter as much. Either way, you want to avoid checking your levels at the time when you are suppose to do an injection. This is considered the trough levels.

Hopefully this gives you a better understanding of how much and how often to administer your testosterone replacement therapy. It should also give you a good idea of when you should be checking your levels. Before making changes to your testosterone replacement therapy you should always check with the prescribing doctor. If you want to maximize the benefits of your testosterone replacement therapy, click on the link below to started with one of our doctors.

How to reduce testosterone in males

how to reduce testosterone in males

How to Lower Testosterone Levels

This article was co-authored by Damaris Vega, MD and by wikiHow staff writer, Hannah Madden. Dr. Damaris Vega is a board certified Endocrinologist. She graduated Magna Cum Laude from the Pontifical Catholic University of Puerto Rico with a BS in General Science and subsequently earned an MD from the Ponce School of Medicine, Ponce, PR. During medical school, Dr. Vega served as president of the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society and was selected as her school’s representative for the American Association of Medical Colleges. She then completed a residency in Internal Medicine and a fellowship in Endocrinology, Diabetes, Mineral, and Metabolism at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Dr. Vega has been recognized for excellent patient care multiple times by the National Committee for Quality Assurance and received the Patients’ Choice Award in 2008, 2009, and 2015. She is a fellow of the American College of Clinical Endocrinologists and is an active member of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the American Diabetes Association, and the Endocrine Society. Dr. Vega is also the founder and CEO of Houston Endocrinology Center as well as a principal investigator for multiple clinical trials at Juno Research, LLC.

There are 10 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, several readers have written to tell us that this article was helpful to them, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 1,033,413 times.

While testosterone is usually seen as a male hormone, everyone produces testosterone to some degree. High testosterone can lead to a lot of uncomfortable symptoms in any sex, including acne, weight gain, and increased aggression. If you’ve had a blood test to confirm your high testosterone levels, there are a few changes you can make in your daily life to start lowering them over time. Be sure to check in with a medical professional regularly to monitor your health and make sure you’re on the right track.

Where to get testosterone

where to get testosterone

Testosterone for Men

Test your testosterone levels and get repeat treatment with free and fast delivery.

To get a treatment, fill in a brief medical questionnaire. A doctor will review your request and prescribe treatment if it’s right for you. For test kits, you can just place an order. Once you’ve sent your sample to our UK accredited partner laboratory, results and advice from our doctors will be ready in 2 to 3 days.

Testosterone is a steroid hormone (an androgen) which men make in their testicles and adrenal glands. Testosterone has a variety of functions and is produced in high amounts in both men and women during puberty. You can test your total testosterone levels using our home test kit. If your level is low, a repeat test is recommended after 4 weeks and you would need to see your GP or specialist to discuss starting treatment. If you have low testosterone and are already prescribed treatment and have regular check ups, you can get repeat treatment online.

About testosterone level testing and treatment

Who can get testing or treatment online?

  • You’re aged 18 to 65
  • You have had 2 blood tests 4 weeks apart by your GP or specialist which have confirmed low testosterone
  • You have testosterone deficiency, are currently being treated for it by your specialist, are up to date with checkups and have been on testosterone replacement treatment for a year
  • You don’t have current or past health conditions that make testosterone treatment unsafe

How the test works

The test used to measure testosterone levels is a blood test. It is a convenient way to test your total testosterone levels without having to see a doctor:

  • Your kit will contain 3 lances and a collection tube
  • You will provide a sample of blood from your finger
  • The sample will be used to test your testosterone levels

Your results will be provided to you via your account. They should be ready within 2–3 days of the laboratory receiving your sample.

Levels of testosterone can vary a lot during the day and with meals. It is important that your blood sample is taken early in the morning (between 7am and 11am) and that you are fasting (this means that you should not eat or drink anything, except water, from 11pm the night before). If you have diabetes or have been told not to fast please chat to your GP or online doctor before taking the test.

It is also important that you don’t take the sample if you are feeling unwell as this can also lower your testosterone level.

Side effects of testosterone replacement therapy

The side effects of testosterone replacement therapy can include:

  • local skin irritation if testosterone gel is used
  • too much water in your body (fluid retention)
  • acne
  • greasy (oily) skin
  • growing breast tissue (which in men is called gynecomastia)
  • passing more urine
  • higher risk of prostate abnormalities
  • higher number of red blood cells
  • higher risk of blood clots

What is testosterone?

Testosterone is a steroid hormone, also called an androgen, which is mainly produced by the testicles (testes) in men.

  • the growth of body hair
  • penis growth during puberty
  • sex drive and function
  • deepening of the voice during puberty
  • muscle development

Everybody has testosterone in their body. Women make testosterone in their ovaries, but their levels are around 1/10 of the male level.

The adrenal glands are also responsible for making testosterone in both men and women. This page will focus on testosterone in men.

The level of testosterone in the body is carefully controlled. There are two glands which help to control the amount of testosterone produced in the testicles – the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland.

What is a healthy testosterone level?

A good total testosterone level in non-obese men aged 19-39 years is between 12 and 31 nmol/L (nanomoles per litre).

The level of testosterone in men gets lower with age, at a rate of 1% to 2% each year.

Testosterone levels in men are usually at their highest in the morning, and at their lowest in the late afternoon or evening.

What happens when a man’s testosterone is low?

If a male’s testosterone level drops and is low, then symptoms occur. The most common consequences of low testosterone are:

  • sexual dysfunction (erectile dysfunction, loss of morning erections, low sex drive)
  • reduced muscle mass and strength
  • anemia
  • impaired cognitive function
  • low mood
  • reduced energy

Other risks associated with low testosterone levels even with no symptoms are:

What happens if testosterone is high in a man?

If a male’s testosterone level is high, symptoms include:

  • acne
  • fluid retention
  • reduced testicle size
  • loss of body hair
  • decreased sperm count
  • swelling of the prostate gland
  • enlargement of the breasts

Other risks associated with high testosterone levels even without symptoms are:

How can I get tested for my testosterone level?

We offer a home blood test to determine total testosterone levels.

The process is quick and easy – just follow these simple steps:

  1. Place an order and get your kit delivered to your door, or collect from a local Post Office (delivery is free)
  2. Collect a few drops of blood using a finger-prick test
  3. Send your samples to our UK based, accredited partner laboratory (postage is free)
  4. Once your results are available (in 2 to 3 days), our doctors will review your results
  5. One of our doctors will contact you, via a secure and confidential message in your patient account, to let you know your results and give you advice and support on what to do next

In some cases, the doctor may need to ask for more information. They may contact you by phone, so make sure your telephone number is up to date in your online account.

You can also ask for a blood test from your doctor. In this case, it will be a full blood test, where a sample will be taken from a vein in your arm.

If your test shows that you have low testosterone, you will be recommended to repeat the test to confirm it before taking any other decision. If it is confirmed, you will need to have a complete check up with your doctor to assess the cause and to discuss starting TRT.

How do I boost my testosterone level?

There are ways to boost your testosterone levels.

  • High intensity workouts seem to be the most beneficial
  • Exercise can help maintain testosterone levels, and increase them in some cases if they are low
  • Stress training in the evening may have a big effect
  • Drinking less alcohol or avoiding other substances like cannabis can help reduce the risk of low testosterone levels
  • Eating a balanced diet can promote healthy testosterone levels
  • Maintain a health weight as being overweight is linked to low testosterone levels
  • You may be prescribed testosterone supplements by a specialist if your levels are low
  • A doctor will assess whether supplements are the right treatment for you
  • You can also get treatment for the consequences of low testosterone, e.g. medications like Viagra for erectile dysfunction

There are some other supplements which may help to boost your testosterone levels, including:

What is the best treatment for low testosterone?

If you have low testosterone levels you may be referred to a specialist called an endocrinologist. You may be offered testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) which can be in the form of:

If you’re currently taking TRT, you’re happy with it, and you meet our criteria for treatment, then you can reorder online with us.

Advantages of testosterone gel treatment:

  • The main advantage of testosterone gels is that they provide a stable testosterone level for 24 hours with one application per day
  • Testosterone gel is safe for most men, as long as it’s been prescribed by a doctor
  • These gels can be a good option for improving quality of life for men who have a low testosterone level
  • It is recommended to apply the gel about the same time each day (preferably in the morning), to clean, dry skin
  • Depending on your treatment, the location where to apply the gel can vary (your doctor should give you instructions on this)
  • Spread the gel gently until it is completely absorbed into your skin, then cover up where you applied the gel. Use loose clothing to avoid the gel spreading to other people

Thing to be aware of when using testosterone gels:

  • Testosterone gel may give positive results in drug tests for work or sports
  • Androgens (like TRT) should not be used for increasing your muscle mass, unless this is recommended by a doctor. They should also not be used to increase fitness or levels of physical activity
  • Testosterone treatments can lower the amount of sperm that your body produces. So, it is important that if you plan to have children in the future you discuss this with your doctor before using testosterone gel

If you’re receiving testosterone treatment and you want to test your levels – ask your doctor what the best time of the day is to do it, as it can vary depending on the testosterone treatment you are taking.

Dr Simran Deo qualified from St George’s, University of London in medicine in 2006 with a distinction in her written finals. She went on to specialise in general practice, obtaining the MRCGP certification in 2012. In 2014 she received a merit for the Diploma in Dermatology from Cardiff University.

  • All medical information we publish has been written or verified by a ZAVA doctor to ensure accuracy.
  • Each article includes the profile of the doctor who wrote or reviewed it, as well as the date on which the medical content was last reviewed and updated.
  • Our aim is to keep the information up to date and to ensure that it is correct and accurate to the best of our ability. We update our content when new medical information becomes available. To find out more, see our Editorial Charter.
  • If you have any comments or would like to share a suggestion with us, please feel free to email us at [email protected]

Get testosterone

get testosterone

How to Legally Buy Testosterone Online

Buying testosterone online or from a doctor’s office can be a big step. But online testosterone therapy is legal and safer than ever, as long as you’re working with a reputable company.

Stringent safeguards in telemedicine have helped ensure that prescribing testosterone can happen only if all parties (doctor, patient, and pharmacy) remain in legal compliance with the guidelines imposed by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

So how do you go about buying testosterone online, legally? It’s natural to have some basic questions. Fortunately, we can provide you with in-depth answers.

Hone’s at-home testosterone assessment is the simplest way to uncover whether your levels are low. If you qualify for treatment, TRT can be sent right to your door.

Is It Legal to Buy Testosterone Online?

Yes! It is 100 percent legal to buy testosterone online, as long you have a prescription, and the site that you are buying from follows DEA guidelines.

If a site states that you don’t require a prescription or don’t need to show proof of a diagnosed medical condition, do not buy testosterone or any other prescription medication from them. They are not in compliance with DEA guidelines, and chances are they’re operating illegally.

These guidelines are completely for your benefit and well-being. Here’s what they entail:

  • Having a health condition that has been validly diagnosed by a physician with whom there is a legitimate doctor/patient relationship.
  • Establishing a preliminary blood panel, a history, and a physical exam.
  • Documentation that the doctor and patient have discussed the risks and benefits of using testosterone based on the patient’s lab values, medical history, and symptom profile.
  • That the physician and pharmacy operating online are based and licensed within the United States. Many states require the physician to be licensed in the very state where a patient is located.

If a pharmacy doesn’t have an actual US address or claims they can provide testosterone prescriptions online after you fill out a short form, do not engage with them. Filling out a form does not qualify you to receive a viable, legal prescription.

Why These Guidelines Are In Place

Testosterone is a male steroid hormone (though testosterone therapy is not the same as taking anabolic steroids). Your body makes testosterone when a message is sent from the brain to the pituitary gland, which fires a signal to the testicles to produce testosterone.

In the years since testosterone was first synthesized in the 1930s, it has been sold for reasons other than to treat clinically significant deficient hormone levels in men.

For example, some men want to buy testosterone online to increase muscle mass or sexual performance or to fight the age-related decrease in testosterone.

To address the problem, the US government’s Anabolic Steroids Control Act of 1990 placed testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) in Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act. According to the DEA’s website (1), Schedule III drugs, substances or chemicals are defined as drugs with a moderate to low potential for physical and psychological dependence.

If any pharmacy or physician tells you differently, they are either committing an illegal act or they are not offering you legitimate testosterone.

How Do I Buy Testosterone Online from Hone?

If you have a clinical testosterone deficiency and you want to buy testosterone online, you can feel safe ordering it from Hone.

We are fully compliant with all federal and state laws regarding the prescription and sale of testosterone. Our team has worked tirelessly to provide you with a safe, legal, and simple step-by-step process.

1. Measure your biomarkers

If you experience one or several symptoms of low testosterone levels (some common ones include irritability, weight gain, erectile dysfunction, decreased muscle mass, loss of body hair, and a low sex drive), be proactive and have your hormones tested. One way to do so is to order Hone’s at-home hormone assessment.

You’ll collect a blood sample (just a finger prick!) in the privacy of your home, and mail it to the lab that partners with Hone.

Hone’s partner lab is accredited by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP). The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regulates all clinical laboratory testing performed on humans in the United States through CLIA.

2. Consult with a Hone-affiliated physician

After the lab tests your levels for multiple hormones, including your total and free testosterone levels, they’ll contact you with the results of your blood test.

From there, you’ll schedule an online video consultation with a board-certified physician.

These doctors, licensed in your home state, specialize in the fields of hormone optimization, endocrinology, urology, and internal medicine.

3. Discuss treatment options with your doctor

During your consultation, your physician will go over the results of your hormone assessment and discuss how you’re feeling before recommending any course of treatment.

You can find out more specific details on what it’s like to have a conversation with a doctor regarding testosterone and TRT here.

If, after reviewing your blood work, the doctor’s diagnosis is that your T levels are significantly and clinically deficient, they will explain the different types of hormone therapy and supplements available to you, as well as each method’s particular benefits.

Some of the treatment options offered by Hone that they might discuss include testosterone cypionate (the most commonly prescribed form of testosterone), Clomid (a medication used for hypogonadism and low testosterone), and Anastrazole, which is used when men have elevated estrogen levels.

They will also discuss possible side effects of each treatment. TRT side effects can include increased red blood cell production (which can increase the risk for blood clots and high blood pressure), testicle shrinkage, and decreased sperm count.

Also, note that your healthcare provider will recommend TRT first; you must undergo a confirmatory assessment to verify the doctor’s initial diagnosis before you receive a prescription.

4. Subscribe to your customized treatment

Once a second blood test confirms the initial diagnosis and recommended treatment, your doctor will document and issue a valid, current, electronic prescription for your TRT medication and dosage.

After that, you purchase an active monthly subscription plan through Hone, which will collect pertinent demographic information, set up your prescription with the pharmacy, and ensure the monthly delivery of your medication to your home. hormone

Cheap Canadian Pharma LLC. 775 Cambie St, Vancouver, BC, Canada. All Rights Reserved.