How can testosterone be increased naturally?

how can testosterone be increased naturally?

11 Science-Backed Ways to Boost Testosterone Naturally

If your T levels are low, there are a few ways to give them a lift. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may be needed to get levels back up to the normal range, but you can also increase testosterone naturally. If your T is too low, a host of problems can crop up. You might feel tired and lethargic, your sex drive may peter out, you may struggle to focus at work or home, or you could find it impossible to make gains at the gym, even with an all-out effort (1). The decline can also increase your risk of long-term health conditions like diabetes, heart disease (2), and even an early death (3). Several factors can cause testosterone levels to lag, including normal aging: Each year after the age of 35, men’s testosterone levels start to decline by around 1 percent per year (4). Replenishing those levels is key to living your life at your full potential. If you haven’t tested your T levels yet (Hone can help with that), or aren’t ready for TRT, there are plenty of ways to naturally boost your testosterone. How to increase testosterone quickly and naturally? Here are 11 of our favorite strategies.

How to Naturally Boost Testosterone Levels

1. Hit the Protein Sweet Spot

Testosterone is found in the bloodstream in two forms. It can be bound to a protein called sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) or albumin, which transports testosterone throughout the body. This form of testosterone—called total T—is biologically inactive (meaning: it doesn’t exert its effects upon the body). Total T makes up about 98 percent of your overall testosterone levels. The remaining two percent—called free T—is what’s vital. Free T floats around and binds to the right receptors to keep your body in optimal condition. The more free T in your system, the better. Protein can limit SHBG (5), leaving you with more free T to do its job. Eating enough protein can also help you drop extra pounds, which is important since obesity holds the title as the most effective predictor of low testosterone in men (6).

Just don’t go overboard; a small study by the University of Worcester found that men who limited carbs and got 35 percent of their calories from protein had lower testosterone levels (7), so balance is key. While a well-marbled bone-in ribeye the size of your face may be stupendously appealing, 5 or 6 ounces of lean beef, chicken, eggs, or fish are your best option. Protein doesn’t have to exclusively come from meat, either; plenty of seeds, nuts, and tofu pack a strong protein punch. Avoid too much tofu; soy products can send your T levels plummeting (8). Soy foods are also high in phytoestrogens, plant-based substances that mimic the effects of estrogen that may reduce testosterone (9).